Vanhoozer on the Divine Energies?

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I recently read an interesting interview of Kevin Vanhoozer on “Exiled Preacher” about Vanhoozer’s new book Remythologizing Theology. He says some interesting things regarding “God’s self-communicative activity.”

“What we can, and must, say of God is that he is the one who creates, commands, consoles, etc. by speaking. God makes himself known and shares his life largely through speech acts like promising, instructing, forgiving, and exhorting, as well as through his corporeal discourse – the Word made flesh – Jesus Christ. If we let Scripture guide our thinking, then we must say that God’s triune being is in his communicative activity. We derive our understanding of the divine attributes not by analyzing the idea of infinite perfection but by describing and detailing the predicates and perfections of God’s communicative activity.”

“I use the term “communicate” in a very broad sense, not merely in the sense “to transmit information,” but “to make common” or “share.” The most important thing that God communicates is himself: his light (truth), life (energy), and love (relationship). Whereas the end of causation is coercion, the end of communication is communion. The category of communicative action opens up new possibilities for theism and adheres more closely to the categories of Scripture itself.”

“God calls us into being and communicates his light, life, and love so that we can communicate them to others.”

It will be interesting to see how he tries to develop his understanding of God’s self-communicative activity in light of his commitment to “classical theism” and the “reformed tradition.”

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2 Responses to “Vanhoozer on the Divine Energies?”

  1. David Says:

    If I didn’t know better, I would have said that these quotes came from the mouth of Mike Horton. He and Vanhoozer share a lot of emphases and trajectories in common (especially their favorite hobby horse, Speech Act Theory). If you want to know where Vanhoozer is going (and how he is likely to fit these ideas within Reformed Orthodoxy), you should read Horton’s “Covenant and Eschatology” and “Covenant and Salvation.”

  2. Krause Says:

    I think after I get through a couple of the other things on my plate I should head down and try to link plus a the vanhoozer and a horton book or two. I’m curious.

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